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 2009 .
 
 

Alton Takiyama-Chung
Thursday April 2, 2009
Jefferson County Library Annex


Takiyama-Chung tells stories about the lssei and Nisei (1st & 2nd generation Japanese-Americans) that offer glimpses into the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, the Internment Camps and the creation of all Japanese-American military units.



Joan Yasui Emerson
Saturday April 4, 2009
 Jefferson County Library Annex

Photo coming soon

Joan Yasui Emerson, eldest granddaughter of Masuo, will share remembrances of growing up Sansei (3rd generation), unique family experiences, personal stories and lessons from important moments of family history.

   

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           View Event Handouts  This file is in Adobe Acrobat format (.pdf).
           View Event Poster  This file is in Adobe Acrobat format (.pdf).


Sponsors:     Rodriguez Family
                   Jefferson County Library District
                   Jefferson County Cultural Coalition
                   Don & Ruth Ann Hopps
                   Oregon Reads 2009


A Family Gathering

A film by Lise Yasui & Ann Tegnell



". . . personal and profoundly moving, a film of extraordinary power. The filmmaker's deceptively quiet narrative tells the story of her quest to break through the silence of her family about its past. . . Most highly recommended for all collections." - Choice

 


 
 


  

Stubborn Twig
by Lauren Kessler

Stubborn Twig” is a factual account of three generations of a Japanese-American family living in the Pacific Northwest. It begins in 1903, when Masuo Yasui arrived in Hood River, Oregon, to seek his fortune. This part of the story is similar to other immigrants' tales-years of hard work, loneliness, and struggles with a new language and customs. The striking distinction appears around 1919, with the rise of anti-Japanese sentiment. Yasui, his brother, their wives, and children had sacrificed much to establish a thriving general store and owned several orchards. Yasui, who spoke fluent English, was the acknowledged leader of the Japanese community in the area and an active member of the orchardists' cooperatives, the Methodist Church, and the Rotary Club. His family continued to have great success despite discrimination. Their lives were painfully disrupted, however, on December 7, 1941. Yasui was arrested as a spy and imprisoned for the rest of the war; his relatives were scattered and some were interned. This book puts human faces and emotions to the events of that period. Readers learn how racism and internment continued to affect the choices and decisions of second-generation family members. Part sociological study, part American history, part family saga.



Bat 6
          (for middle readers)
by Virginia Euwer Wolff

Set against the backdrop of a softball game played in Oregon in 1949, “Bat 6” brilliantly probes issues such as racial prejudice, illegitimacy, and life in a small town. The story revolves around Aki, who has spent several years in a Japanese internment camp, and Shazam, whose father was killed at Pearl Harbor. During the annual baseball competition, Shazam attacks Aki, injuring her severely. The game ends suddenly, and all of the players are left to wonder what share of the responsibility they bear. With honesty and powerful insight, the story is told through the first-person narrations of the 21 girls on the two teams.






Apples to Oregon
          (for younger readers)
by Deborah Hopkinson

Apples to Oregon” begins when Papa decides to pull up roots and move from Iowa to Oregon, he can't bear to leave his precious apple trees behind. Or his peaches, plums, grapes, cherries, and pears. Oh, and he takes his family along too. But the trail is cruel -- first there's a river to cross that's wider than Texas...and then there are hailstones as big as plums...and there's even a drought, sure to crisp the cherries. Those poor pippins! Luckily Delicious (the non-edible apple of Daddy's eye) is strong -- as young 'uns raised on apples are -- and won't let anything stop her father's darling saps from tasting the sweet Oregon soil.






 

 
 


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